Dreaming of Something New?

News sites are full of stories about people quitting their jobs. It seems that as they come out of the pandemic and reflect on the not just the last 16 months but also the next 16 months, they are reevaluating their priorities.

We have been following several families who live on boats fulltime (see them here and here). https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZdQjaSoLjIzFnWsDQOv4ww/videos. They sail around the world taking videos of themselves and their surroundings. With revenue from Google, sponsors and patrons, we figure they are making more than enough money to keep themselves and their boats happy and comfortable.

There is the wanna-be author who decided to sell everything and move to a small town in a remote area. She works at a shop in town and is focused on writing her best seller.

I know a couple who moved out of the city when their jobs went remote. Now that their employers want them back in the office, they are working on finding roles that will always be remote. There is too much to like in their new commute-less lifestyle.

Think about all the people who turned to baking or meal making for comfort in the early pandemic days. First, it was just for their families, but then they started offering, trading or selling those loaves and casseroles to friends and neighbours. Now they have a legit side gig that could turn into a very satisfying living.

And finally, there is the group of people who had pushed their retirement out by a few years. Many of them are deciding that maybe retiring now would be a good idea. The Zoom era was just too exhausting.

This all adds up to challenge and opportunity. Challenge if you find yourself short handed but so much opportunity to explore new ways to spend your days. Take some time to consider what you are doingeveryday. Maybe you have some great options — you just need to look up.

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Stepping Away

No career advice or pithy networking comments today….I have stepped away from my computer this week. Time to recharge and refresh.

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Not Everyone is on Vacation – The Summer Job Search

It is summer and the market is hopping!

It seems that the summer job market slowdown is a total myth. I have been talking with candidates who have multiple opportunities on the go.  And it’s not just in one vertical – engineering, product development, organizational development and the whole gambit.

If you have been putting off looking for something new because you believe everyone is on vacation, you can keep using that as an excuse, but be aware, it’s really just a way to procrastinate

If you really want to find a new position, do not start by looking at LinkedIn jobs.  That’s right.  Do not start there.

Start with your resume.  Get it up to date with your title, responsibilities, achievements, courses and volunteer stuff. Make it interesting and dynamic. Triple check for spelling, grammar and acronyms.

Then reach out to your references and tell them you might need them in the future.

(This gives you instant allies and a super positive network to draw on for support.

Once those things are done, then you can sit down with the LinkedIn Jobs app and see what’s going on.  Don’t use just LinkedIn.  Check out other job sites, your professional association website, local neighbourhood resources and social media. You’d might be surprised at the jobs posted on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

Apply directly or network through a friend.  Many companies have referral programs that pay $1000 or more for a referred employee who “sticks”.

Find your resume and get the ball rolling.  You could still have a new job for Labour Day.

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Cover Letters: Necessary or Outdated?

People offer to send me cover letters all the time.  I tell them not to bother.  My job is to provide notes to my client about each candidate so in effect, I am writing the cover letter for them.

But what about when you are applying to jobs directly?

It can be tricky to decide but whatever you do, cover letters need to be written individually.

envelope

You can have a standard paragraph in the middle but the rest of it needs to be customized every time.

If you are applying to a position online and there is no mention of a cover letter, then you can probably get away with just your resume.  Many application systems have questionnaires as part of the application process.  That is the company’s way of getting most of what would be in a cover letter.

If you see a posting that asks specifically for a cover letter, then pay attention to what it’s asking for.  A lot of times, an employer wants you to lay out your goals, achievements or maybe why you think you are right for them/the role.

Take a look at the tone of the ad and also look at their website.  Try to get a feel for the culture and use this to decide the tone and format of your note.  If the company is really creative or casual, use that style but if it seems corporate and formal, then go with that.

If you are referred by someone, you definitely need a cover letter that explains who referred you, their relationship with you and why the role matters to you.

Two points to remember:

Keep your cover letter short and to the point.  It is not your life story.  It should talk about who you are, what you are good at and how to get in touch.  All of the other details are in your resume.

Double and triple check the spelling – especially the name and title of the person you are addressing.  Nothing gets your letter in the trash faster than misspelling someone’s name.

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The Best Time to Find a Great Job is when you have a Great Job

I had an interesting situation this week.  One of my candidates, who has been on a long and successful interview journey, ended up with several offers in his inbox.

He was really stressed.  He said he could not understand how this happened.  He was not even looking.  He really likes his job and his team. 

How did this happen?

First of all, he is an interesting and curious person.  When I told him about my client and what they needed to do, he thought it made sense to explore the opportunity.  He felt that it would allow him to build up his skills in a new area.

The first two interviews went really well.  He and a couple of senior managers had wide ranging conversations and he felt really good about it.

Guess what?  After that second interview, he was walking around with just a bit more confidence.  He had third party validation that he was doing some really good work in a really good way. 

It’s not as noticeable as a haircut or new glasses but that kind of confidence shows.

Seemingly out of the blue, he got a couple of networking requests and coffee invitations.  Those led to more casual conversations. Casual, because he had moved beyond “interview panic prep” mode and into “this is just a business meeting” mode.

On top of that, his boss started to let him know about some longer term projects that he would be leading. 

To be clear:  he was not a disgruntled employee complaining about things at work.  No one was trying to placate him or keep him in order to get though the busy cycle.

I suggested that he look at multiple offers as a positive thing not a stressful thing.  It’s a positive measure of how he is successfully navigating his path through the industry.

After weighing the teams, the work, the manager and the future possibilities, he made a solid choice.  I think he is going to be very happy. 

So, get off the merry-go-round of your job and take a look around.  Because looking when you are not looking may the best time to look.

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Summer Hiring is Brisk

Now that the worst of the pandemic seems to be behind us and patios are open, the temptations are everywhere.

  • One Dilly bar or two
  • Patio or office
  • Golf course or sales calls
  • Comfy shirt or pressed blouse
  • Resume or romance novel

Don’t get sucked into thinking that hiring stops for the summer.  It doesn’t. Sure it might take longer if decision makers are on vacation but the hiring process carries on. Especially in this brisk economy.

In fact, networking can be even more powerful now. When you call someone and invite them for lunch, they are more likely to be free and willing to get out of their home office to meet on a patio or go for a walk.

Meeting folks while at the cottage or on a stay-cation is pretty easy too. The last time I went to a resort in cottage country, I made it my goal to meet one new person each day. I came home with three new connections and a business lead. Awesome.

You can also do some surfing to find industry events and conferences taking place in the fall. Beat the rush and get approval now. You will look pretty motivated and forward thinking in the process.

But most of all, pay attention. Check out postings and take calls from recruiters. At the very least, you will know what’s going on in the marketplace.

You might find that  LinkedIn and  Prosecco make a great pair. But only one….. Drunk job applications are about as effective as drunk dialing – no way to start a relationship.

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How to Resign with Respect

You are beside yourself with glee.  You have just accepted an offer for a  fantastic new job.  It checks all the boxes: people, scope, location and money.  Yippee!

What to do next?

It is important to plan your next steps with care and respect.  How you leave a job can play a big role in managing your career and your reputation.

Think about how much notice you need to provide to your current employer.  Check your employment agreement.  Many stipulate two or three weeks.  You may want to be magnanimous by offering four weeks but in most cases, it is not necessary.

Then, write a letter of resignation.  Make it formal but friendly.  Thank your manager for providing such a great opportunity to learn and grow.  Lay out the details of your last day and offer to do what’s needed for a smooth transition.

Be prepared for anything and everything when you tell your manager and hand over/email the letter.  Managers do not like it when someone resigns.  It almost always catches them by surprise and then they look bad to their boss when they have to deliver then news.  That’s where counter offers often come in to play.

When faced with an unplanned gap in the team, suddenly there is more money to give you.  Maybe the leadership team really was thinking of promoting you but the fact is, they didn’t and now you have chosen to go somewhere else.

Be firm and resolute in your tone in that “I am leaving” conversation.  Think about (but don’t share) all the reasons you are going to a new and better place.

Once the initial shock wears off, they will figure out who will take over your tasks and life will go on.  That’s why a couple of weeks is almost always fine. It’s not like you can get involved in long term planning or that you will enjoy getting left out of conversations that might be proprietary.  It’s all part of the transition.

So you go.  Your colleagues and managers will wish you well and hopefully, some of them will take a few minutes on Zoom to raise a glass to your future success.

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Tips for Video Panel Interviews

It’s been a year and a half and most of us have adapted to meeting people over a video platform rather than in person. It has been a struggle for some and an easy transition for others but we are mostly there.

Meeting a panel of interviewers over video is another story. When you have a panel interview in person, you know where to look. You can sort out who is talking even when two people are talking at the same time and you don’t have to deal with any kind of techno-lag.

All those things are harder over any video platform, even the most reliable. There can be connection problems, weird noises, people off camera and all manner of other things that can throw you off your game.

Here are some tips to get you through.

Find out the platform that will be used (Teams, Zoom) and make sure that it is set up on your device of choice. A computer is best because it is large and stable. If you are using a phone or tablet, make sure you use a stand. Nothing makes a panelist more nauseous then the image shifting as you hold it in your hand.

If talking on group video calls is not something you do everyday, pull together some friends or family and practice. Give them questions to ask you and get their feedback on how you look and sound.

In your practice rounds, log on and off the call a few times. Nothing is more agonizing than waiting for a video call to connect. It’s only a few seconds but it can seem like hours and in a pressure interview situation, it feels even worse. The more comfortable you are with that, the better you will present.

The big advantage to a video call is that you can have notes around you. Think about the important skills, stories and experiences that you want to get across to the panel and make some sticky notes or index cards. You can have them on part of your screen or you can tape them to the side of your monitor. It’s a great way to provide cues for yourself.

Prepare the same way you would for an in-person meeting. Do the research about the company, the challenges ahead and background about the panelists. Think about how your experience would benefit them. Remember, it is not really about why you want this role. The panel will ask you about that but it’s not the key. The key is what problems will you solve and how you will help the grow.

Finally, have a list of questions you want to ask the panel. Open ended questions are best. Ask why they chose the organization, what qualities do successful people have, what big projects are coming up. Getting them talking will give you real insight into who they are and whether they are your people or not.

So take a deep breath and click Connect. They can’t see you sweat on video.

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It’s a Funny Story…….

Over the last few weeks I have been asking candidates how they got into their professions. And more than two thirds started their answer with “well, it’s a funny story”.


Then they proceed to talk about the seemingly unrelated series of events that took place and culminated in them landing in their current role.


This gives me great cause for optimism. I read a lot about workplace transformation and AI and jobs disappearing. And I worry. I worry about how people will be able to keep pace with the shifts in the workplace.


But if so many people fall into jobs that they never could have imagined when they were in school then I guess there is a certain amount of hope that they will continue to follow new paths.


I have read about journalists who are working in digital marketing, an English grad who is working in software development and a music student who ended up being a great project manager.
Many of their initial opportunities came from networking. Often it’s a former colleague or a former manager who reached out or made a key suggestion.


The takeaways:

Keep your network warm. Make sure they know who you are and what you care about. (Not just your title and company).


Be open to listening to ideas and evaluating them as you go. If you are always “way too busy” to consider a new opportunity, they will cease to come your way.


Read a lot. Read about your industry, the tools you use, the news of the day and a bit about the economy. Keep your world broader than your desk.


Basically, if you keep your eyes open for ways to explore and learn about the future, you will be ready when it arrives.

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Small Bits to Reduce Burnout

I am burned out from reading articles on being burned out.  The theme is dominating mainstream media and all my social channels.  Frankly, it’s exhausting.  Fixing burn out is not easy but let me offer up some suggestions on how to refresh, even if only for a few minutes.

One of the sources of burn out is not attending to small, personal matters.  You get into bed and realize that you still did not call the dentist or drop off the Amazon package you are returning.  Trying to fall asleep while you are berating yourself is pretty tough.

Pick one of those small tasks.  Only one.  Look at your calendar for tomorrow.  Find 15 minutes.  Make a meeting that includes not just the thing you need to do but also the details.  If the task is calling the dentist, make sure the phone number is in the meeting. 

When that times comes tomorrow, do the task.  Feel accomplished.  Add a task for the next day.  See what you did there?  Getting personal shit done without disrupting your business life. 

The other big contributor to burn out is the loss of random social encounters.  Remember when we could bump into someone at the coffee machine or in the elevator.  Just a 10 minute catch up put a real bounce in my step.  It was out of routine.  It was positive.  It had a great return on investment. 

Think of a couple of people you have not spoken to in a while.  It could be someone you see on Zoom group calls but never get a chance to speak to or maybe the person with the new puppy who works in another department.

Pull up the old calendar and create a meeting. Drop their name in the attendees section and then open the Scheduling Assistant.  Find 30 minutes when you are both free.  Make sure it is not a day when you or the other person have back to back to back meetings.  That is certainly not conducive to a catch-up call.  Use “Catch Up Call” or “Miss You Call” in the subject line.  That way they know there is no agenda and nothing to prepare. 

Maybe you like it so much, you set up a once a month call.  How wonderful would that be?

These two strategies may be small, but they pay big dividends in restoring your mental energy and zhuzhing up to your outlook.

Thank you to my excellent colleague, Nancy Gore, for some great suggestions on this topic.

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